Dungeon Run 2 – The Encounters

I’ve been working on my expansion to Dungeon run for a while now, and while things don’t exactly flow sequentially, I find it makes for better blog posts, so I’ll go ahead and take this tact.

In actuality, I am working on four-five tabs at once, and things get fleshed out over time, but it’s just easier to reveal entire swaths at once.  So, let’s start with the encounters, shall we?

As I said in my previous post, I started by identifying all of the different columns that were available to encounter cards.  Primarily this includes name, type, race, attacks, offense, defense, escape, & life.  That covers all of the basic parts of a monster card, but it doesn’t cover traps (which also require Disarm & Damage) or strangers, which simply have a block of text.  Add those all together, and you have the bones you need to start creating the various card types.

I set forth originally to create 50 total encounter cards (though I wound up falling far short of that).  Arbitrarily, I opted on making four new bosses, four strangers, ten traps, and the rest would be monsters.  Let’s take a look at each individually

Traps:

Though I’m starting out with them (based upon the order that they fell in my spreadsheet), traps were actually the last types of encounters that I created.  This is because I felt like they were largely unimaginative: you just put a trap name and then do a little damage to players.  The one overarching theme I tried to integrate into the traps was what Plaid Hat had mentioned in their spoilers for their rendition: “The Traps in Dungeon Run 2 focus less on causing damage and more on causing mayhem.”  With that in mind, I tried to come up with trap ideas that suited that theme and this is where I landed:

Name Type Disarm Damage
Fortune Glyph Trap Choose skill or magic.  Roll a number of dice equal to this rating.  Every roll of a 4+ is a success.  3 successes are needed to draw the top two treasure cards. Each other player draws a treasure card.
Net Trap Trap Choose skill or brawn.  Roll a number of dice equal to this rating.  Every roll of a 4+ is a success.  2 successes are needed to avoid the penalty. Your turn ends.  Skip your next turn.
Grease Slide Trap Roll a number of dice equal to your skill.  Every roll of a 4+ is a success.  2 successes are needed to avoid the penalty. Move back into the room you came from.  If there is a monster there, it gains a free attack.
Magnetic Floor Trap Trap Choose skill or brawn.  Roll a number of dice equal to this rating.  Every roll of a 4+ is a success.  2 successes are needed to avoid the penalty. Take 1 damage and discard one equipped item if able.
Trap Door Trap Roll a number of dice equal to your Skill.  Every roll of a 4+ is a success.  2 successes are needed to avoid the penalty. The first player moves your hero to any explored room of their choice.
Tar Trap Trap Roll a number of dice equal to your skill.  Every roll of a 4+ is a success.  3 successes are needed to avoid the penalty. Take 1 damage.  Your turn ends.
Illusionary Floor Trap Trap Choose skill or magic.  Roll a number of dice equal to this rating.  Every roll of a 4+ is a success.  1 success is needed to avoid taking damage. Take 2 damage.
Quicksand Trap Trap Roll a number of dice equal to your skill.  Every roll of a 4+ is a success.  2 successes are needed to avoid the penalty. Each player votes.

Either: You take 2 damage.
Or: Your turn ends.  Skip your next turn.

Swarming Insect Trap Trap Choose magic, skill, or brawn.  Roll a number of dice equal to this rating.  Every roll of a 6+ is a success.  2 successes are needed to avoid the penalty. Take 2 damage.
Illusionary Door Trap Trap Choose skill or magic.  Roll a number of dice equal to this rating.  Every roll of a 4+ is a success.  2 successes is needed to avoid taking damage. If possible, the first player moves your hero to any adjacent unexplored room.  Encounter the square.  Any monsters revealed do not fight as normal, but instead make a free attack on you.

Strangers

Strangers aren’t a huge part of the game, but they’re important enough to make them worthwhile in an expansion.  I didn’t want a huge number of these included, and I wanted them to work around the same sort of themes as the originals: namely, that they would provide some benefit–given a cost of some sort.  I tried to work in areas that the originals omitted (such as ability cards) and also saw a need for some sort of healing within the game.  I’ve noticed in the games we play that players will quite often fall prey to a string of bad attacks which diminish their life totals and set them up for recurring deaths.  As I’ve been on the receiving end of that combo more than once, I recognize that losing multiple turns in a row due to player death is something that needs a fix–so the Angel of Mercy was born.

Pilfoy,  Cave Goblin Merchant Stranger As a special action, a hero sharing a tile with Pilfoy may discard a treasure card and roll a die.  On a 4+, draw a treasure card.

As a special action, discard a monster or trap from your loot pile and roll a die.  On a 4+, draw the top two ability cards from your character deck and choose 1 to keep, discarding the other.

Angel of Mercy Stranger When revealed, each player votes for a hero.  The elected hero is healed of all damage immediately.

Heal one damage if you share a tile with the Angel of Mercy at the end of your turn.

Enlightened Master Stranger As a special action, a hero sharing a tile with the Enlightened Master can discard one skill card.  If they do so, they may search their skill deck for a single skill of their choice and put that into play.  Then the Enlightened Master vanishes and is removed from the game.
The Sage of Waels Stranger As a special action, a hero sharing a tile with the Sage of Waels may test magic.  Every roll of a 6+ is a success.  If you roll 0 successes, take a damage.  If you roll 2 or more successes, you may search the treasure deck for an item and put it into your loot pile, then the Sage of Weals vanishes and is removed from the game.

Monsters:

Undoubtedly, the bulk of the encounter deck was going to be made up of basic monsters.  Again, following Plaid Hat’s inspiration, I threw in a large number of the newest monster type: Demons.  One area where they and I differed is that they said they were eliminating “Animates” from the list and replacing them with Demons.  Instead, I opted to include a few animates, because I had come up with the creature ideas and that seemed like the best available race for them.

I should also mention that these were my initial design ideas for these cards.  Over time, these have morphed a bit (we’ve actually done a little play testing with them, and found some of them to be far too strong).  Likewise, when I was working on creating the actual cards, I’d gone ahead and made more aren’t listed below.  This should give you a reasonably good idea of where my head was at during this stage of the design process though.

Name Type Race Attacks Offense Defense Escape Life Special
Worm of Jealousy Monster Demon 5 3 5 4 5 Assist Only.  When slain, you may exchange one of your active skill cards with a skill card from another player.
Avatar of Vengeance Monster Demon 5 4 4 4 6 Each player votes for a hero.  Avatar of Vengeance is immune to all damage from non-elected heros.  Until the Avatar of Vengeance is slain, the elected hero rolls one less die during combat.
Flailing Nightmare Monster Demon 3 5 4 6 4 Attacks from the Flailing Nightmare cannot be blocked.
Bloated Monstrosity Monster Demon 3 5 2 4 10
Deathbringer Sovereign Monster Demon 6 3 5 5 4 When Deathbringer Sovereign is revealed, no free battle action takes place.  Instead, Deathbringer Sovereign immediately makes a free attack against the hero that revealed it.

Heroes slain by Deathbringer Sovereign may draw the top skill card off their deck.

Noxious Pox Stalker Monster Demon 4 5 5 5 4 For each damage done by Noxious Pox Stalker, also do a damage to each hero that is not already in the tile as the defending hero.
Harbinger of Despair Monster Demon 6 3 6 4 5 When revealed, each player votes for a hero.  Until the Harbinger of Despair is slain, the elected hero cannot use Enchanted item cards.

Instead of fighting, a hero may discard two enchanted treasure cards and take Harbinger of Despair into it’s loot pile.

Embodiment of Rage Monster Demon 7 5 6 5 3 While Embodiment of Rage is on the table, all heroes and monsters roll 1 additional die when attacking.
Greed Incarnate Monster Demon 3 3 4 4 5 Instead of fighting, a hero may discard an equipped treasure card and take Greed Incarnate into it’s loot pile.

When Greed Incarnate roams, discard any treasure or non-summoning stone artifacts on it’s tile.

Temptress of Pride Monster Demon 4 4 4 4 4 For each unblocked damage done by Temptress of pride discard a training marker or skill card.

Instead of fighting, a hero may discard a trap or monster from it’s loot pile and take Temptress of Pride into it’s loot pile.

Fledgeling Vampire Monster Undead 3 5 4 5 3 Transfer 1 wound from the vampire to the hero for each 1 roll as an attack against Fledgeling Vampire.
Granite Golem Monster Animate 4 4 6 2 5 When Deep Troll roams from a tile that has no heros, encounters, or items on it, shuffle that tile into the tile pile
Deep Troll Monster Humanoid 4 4 2 3 5 Regenerates 1 lost wound for every 1 it rolls during an attack.
Keening Banshee Monster Undead 4 5 4 5 3 Keening Banshee can roam to adjacent tiles even they aren’t connected by a corridor.
Doppelganger Monster Animate * 4 4 4 5 Doppelganger rolls the same number of attacks as the hero fighting it.
Cave Goblin Whelp Monster Humanoid 3 5 2 5 3 Crafty:  The first player may make a hero attacking this Cave Goblin Whelp reroll any number of their attack dice.  The new results must be accepted.

Bosses:

Finally, it came down to bosses.  If there’s one area where the first game is lacking, I would say that this is it.  In the first iteration, the bosses are either:

  • Immune to Brawn
  • Immune to Magic
  • Weak (the undead guy)
  • Discouraging you to fight them with friends (the dragon)

Aside from the undead guy, I like their concepts, but there just isn’t enough variety.   There’s also some interesting ideas with the Library, where you can see what the boss is going to be–except there’s no point.  In most cases, your character is clearly designed for brawn or magic, so knowing you’re bound to fight the one that is immune to you is interesting–but there’s really nothing you can do about it.

But I guess that’s more of a topic for when I get to items and rooms.

For now, I wanted to continue the theme.  I wanted to make two more bosses that punished characters with high magic/brawn (though the brawn one never materialized).  The magic one just rolled more dice for the magic you had–making him someone you didn’t want to fight if you’re rolling a large number of dice.  I also liked the idea of a monster that you had to fight with your skill rating (something that I would also incorporate into one of the characters I’m designing).   The other two were just some concept ideas I had that took the bosses in different directions, giving them some unique abilities.

Name Type Race Attacks Offense Defense Escape Life Special
Demigos, Arch Liche Boss Monster Undead 5 4 5 4 7 During Combat, adds a number of attack dice equal to the combined magic rating of all players sharing the tile.
Belphegor, the Slovenly Boss Monster Demon 7 4 3 2 10 Immune to Brawn & Magic.  You must attack Belphegor using your skill rating.

Belphegor may only roam to adjacent rooms.

Xyzit, the Eternal Boss Monster Slime 6 5 6 6 5 For each damage done by Xyzit, remove a wound from it’s card.
Omnigoth, King of Monsters Boss Monster Beast 6 4 5 5 7 Re-roll all successful attacks against Omnigoth.

Omnigoth rolls an extra attack die for each other monster in play.

So that’s the concepting I’d done for the encounters deck.  Like I said, the numbers and skills are completely arbitrary and will likely need to be changed.  We’ve played exactly one game of this to date, and I know I wound up changing three separate cards.  Undoubtedly, I’ll need to change a few more in the future–but that’s part of the iterative design process, right?

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2 comments on “Dungeon Run 2 – The Encounters

  1. Nice job man! Some excellent work that I know you’ve put a lot of time into.
    Some of the cards may require some clarification but I like where you’re going. I was never a big fan of the Boss Monsters being immune to Brawn or Magic (my personal opinion). It does force the players together and adds some complications and mayhem but it really cripples a player and with the end game a bit broken (again my opinion) it really hurts. Excellent work though. Eager to see the actual cards but I know you have work to do with stats. Thanks again for the update!

    • The immunity on the boss monsters may just be bad design, as you feel gyped when you get to them only to find out that they’re immune to your character. I pushed that ability because of the room where you can search to determine who the boss monster is–which seems like a totally useless room without these kinds of bosses.

      On Wed, Aug 8, 2018 at 10:18 PM, Warhammer 39,9999 wrote:

      >

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