Building Progress

wh39kbuildings (26)The title, while seemingly vague, was about as accurate as I could make for this particular post without sounding ridiculous. This post is a continuation of an earlier post where I was assembling buildings. Therefore, this is little more than a progress update to prove that I’ve done something since then. Because I’d already used the intentionally repetitive “building buildings” title, I opted for something simple (though somewhat vague).

But I digress.

wh39kbuildings (24)Since the last post, I mounted the various wall sections to parts of a leftover sheet of 1/8″ plywood that had lying around.  Sadly, I had more buildings than I had plywood, so that resulted in another trip to the hardware store.  On the positive side, the stuff is relatively inexpensive.  On the down side, I now have another 2/3rds of a sheet that’ll probably take up space in the garage for another few years (just like the last one did).

After laying out the pieces in the desired shapes and marking those on the plywood, I cut them out with a circular saw and sanded down the edges (to prevent splinters and weird wearing).  Then I used a hot glue gun to affix each of the building sections to the wood bases.

For the rubble, I largely followed the tutorial I found over at Craven Games, but whereas he advised use of Hirst Arts miscasts, I relied on the following materials:

  • wh39kbuildings (23)Cut up bits of GW Sprue (note here: when cutting the sprue up, be careful to not include bits with writing on either side, as they show up painfully obvious.  For quantity, I saved all of the sprue that came with my GW buildings and used that for the rubble.  I think it’d look better with even more, but I wanted to settle on something that was as playable as it was good looking and–more importantly–I didn’t want to spend more time cutting sprue into even brick-sized chunks).
  • Bits of white plastic from model railroads.  These include tubes and I-beams.
  • Some misc plastic building pieces (such as lights, etc.) from the 40k terrain sets.
  • Various GW/FW mis-cast items made out of cheap plaster of paris.wh39kbuildings (20)
  • Some extra broken wall/floor sections from both the GW & Pegasus Hobby kits.

I used a large blob of hot glue to put these in place, and then coated them with a healthy layer of superglue to ensure nothing was going to move.

Then I added some extra gubbins to the rest of the Pegasus Hobbies buildings.  I had started this in the previous post, but just expanded upon it here: adding little bits of brass etch to large open walls; adding parapets across most of the building tops; wh39kbuildings (19)adding bass wood floor sections with popsicle stick beams to areas that needed a second floor; etc.

In total, this took a couple of evenings work, but when I wound up with a product that seemed sufficient, I added a layer of sand to the board before priming.

This is where I went wrong.  When applying this sand, I used a spray adhesive to make the floor tacky and then applied the sand on top.  After it dried, the sand is prone to flaking off.  This is less true now that I’ve primed all of the buildings, and hopefully a layer of paint and sealant will keep them protected, but if you’re going to follow in my footsteps, I would definitely advise you deviate at this part in assembly.  I’ve heard that a great way to go is to mix the sand in with your paint during the painting stage, and that might work great.  It’s got to work better than what I’ve done…

wh39kbuildings (29)After applying the sand, I did my best to remove any strings left over from use of the hot glue gun, and simply primed them black.

The final photo shows the entire collection of buildings (which I’m now thinking is simply too many, as I’ve already run out of places to store them).  They don’t quite fill up an entire table on their own, but as they’re placed in that photo, it’s entirely too dense to move around them (even for a game like Mordheim or Necromunda).  When spaced out properly, there’s enough there to likely fill up two tables in what would still be considered fairly dense terrain (for an example, check out the terrain from my most recent battle report).

wh39kbuildings (30)So now I’m left to determine what color(s) to paint these.  I don’t know why this decision seems so difficult for me.  I figure I’m going to paint the Pegasus buildings in a stone color, and the GW buildings in various metallics (silver? black? rust?).  I’m not a huge fan of metallic colors normally, so that’s probably where my unease stems from.

Oh well, if you have any great ideas as to color schemes, I’m all ears.  Thanks for dropping by…

Before I forget, I took at least two photos of each building for posterity’s sake.  Below are those photos in thumbnail form.  Free to click on them for a larger version:

wh39kbuildings (28)  wh39kbuildings (27)  wh39kbuildings (1)  wh39kbuildings (25)      wh39kbuildings (17) wh39kbuildings (16)  wh39kbuildings (15)  wh39kbuildings (14)    wh39kbuildings (12)      wh39kbuildings (9)    wh39kbuildings (7)    wh39kbuildings (5)    wh39kbuildings (3)  wh39kbuildings (2) wh39kbuildings (1)  wh39kbuildings (13)  wh39kbuildings (21)  wh39kbuildings (6)  wh39kbuildings (4)  wh39kbuildings (8)  wh39kbuildings (10)  wh39kbuildings (22)  wh39kbuildings (18)  wh39kbuildings (11)

9 comments on “Building Progress

    • I’d agree whole-heartedly. I like the size and simpleness of the pegasus terrain–for the most part–but when you through little butresses on from the GW kits, they really pop.

      Thanks for the comment.

  1. Very awesome. That full table layout is going to be mind-blowing. For the GW buildings, I’ve liked black with gold accents, green with gold accents, and blue with gold accents. There seems to be a pattern here. On all those kits there is a variant color scheme pictured somewhere and I like those. Since all of your buildings are finished you don’t have to worry about Pegasus parts matching each other, so why not paint those differently from each other?

    • Do you have pictures of the colored building examples? I’d love to see them. I’ve, unfortunately, thrown out the boxes that all the buildings came in.

      You also lost me on your last sentence. Are you saying that I should paint the pegasus buildings different colors from each other, or that I should paint the GW bits on those buildings different from the pegasus parts? The reason I suggested that I was prone to painting them stone grey is that’s the way they look: like big cement/stone pillars. Drab grey seems to be the defacto standard for gothic looking buildings. I’m hugely wishy-washy though, so I’m very open to other ideas you might have. 🙂

      Thanks for the rubble inspiration, by the way. Your stuff looks fantastic. I also picked up some “for sale” signs to make portable rubble bases, but I ran out of clipped sprue at the time. Maybe later…

  2. They look awesome. Would love to play on a table full of that terrain.

    Just remember re: stone that it can be sand coloured, pale red, white/pale grey, dark grey, etc. i.e. ‘stone colour’ is in fact ‘lots of different colours’.

    • That’s a good point–I never think of it that way. Some sandstone wouldn’t necessarily be a bad way to go… though that doesn’t have the traditional (read: European) gothic flavor…

  3. I’m sure if you google ‘gothic’ and Cyprus, Spain and probably Malta you might change your mind about what ‘European Gothic’ architecture looks like… I think you have a more northern European building style in mind. Hey – I know what you mean, and I think most people probably think the same. Still; you have options!

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